Health & Safety Committee


Best Practices

The PFI Health & Safety Committee is working to provide comprehensive Best Practices that will assist companies in the shared goal of creating safer environments and workers. These “Best Practices” are designed to provide a framework for companies to achieve that goal.

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BP01 – Argon

Introduction:

Argon is known as one of the “Noble” gases since it does not react with other materials. It is nonflammable, will not support combustion, displaces oxygen, and is not life-supporting. The gas is heavier than air and is only slightly soluble in water. When liquid argon is vaporized and then heated it consumes a large amount of heat, making it an ideal coolant. Argon is a gas that is used in many welding processes. The inerting properties are used as shielding/blanket gas for many welding applications. The area of the weld is protected from airborne contaminants by the shielding gas argon. The argon gas helps keep the weld free of fusion defects, porosity, weak welds, oxidation and other defects due to varying arc length.

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BP02 – Overhead Cranes

Introduction:

These practices are intended to maintain a safe workplace for employees; therefore, it cannot be overemphasized that only qualified and licensed individuals shall operate these devices. The guidance within these practices applies to the use of cranes and hoists installed in or attached to buildings and to all personnel who use such devices.

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BP03 – Recordkeeping

Introduction:

OSHA places significant emphasis on injury and illness recordkeeping because the data pulled from employers’ injury and illness logs is used by OSHA to identify workplace safety and health trends and to track progress in resolving those issues. OSHA also uses recordkeeping data to improve standards, tailor enforcement programs, and focus individual inspections.

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BP04 – Rigging

Introduction:

These practices are intended to maintain a safe workplace for employees; therefore, it cannot be overemphasized that only qualified and competent individuals shall inspect and use rigging equipment. The guidance within these practices applies to the inspection and use of rigging equipment to move and/or lift material and to all personnel who use such devices.

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